Pour le Bac et plus particulièrement pour l’oral d'anglais sur la notion de « Myths and Heroes », tu trouveras certainement des idées dans cet article sur Barack Obama.

Ce cours de soutien scolaire anglais est orienté révision bac. Val propose de suivre cette méthode sur le thème des mythes et héros (myths and heroes) et préparer au mieux ton oral de baccalauréat.

Martin Luther King and Barack Obama, Myths and Heroes

Martin Luther King and Barack Obama

Barack Obama. The American Dream.  

Essaie de faire l’exercice suivant sur les mythes et héros en remplissant les blancs avec les mots que tu reconnais ou les sons que tu reconnais. Si tu ne connais  pas le mot, essaie de noter la phonétique de ce que tu entends. Ce type de processus t’aidera : quand tu découvriras le mot en question en corrigeant l’exercice, tu finiras par faire le lien entre la prononciation et le mot. La prochaine fois, non seulement tu le prononceras correctement mais tu le reconnaîtras aussi dans la langue parlée.


For your A Level examination and more precisely for the oral on the Myths and Heroes theme, you may be able to use some ideas from this article. You will also find a listening exercise on an extract of Barack Obama’s speech which will help you develop your aural skills. Try and do the following exercise filling in the blanks with words you recognise or with the sounds you recognise.  If you really don’t know the word, try to put down the phonetics for what you hear. This type of process will help you:  as you discover the actual word when you correct the exercise, you will end up making a link between the pronunciation and the word. Next time you will not only pronounce it correctly but you will also recognise it in spoken language.

Here is the text to fill in with the help of the video link which I give you below:
"Unless you're Native American, you came from someplace else."

"Immigration's always been an issue that inflames ………………………... That's not ……………………………. There are a few things that are more important to us as a ………………………….. than who gets to come here and call our country home. Who gets the privilege of ……………………………. a citizen of the United States of America. That's a big deal. When we talk about that in the abstract, it is easy sometimes for the …………………… to take on a feeling of us versus them. And when that ……………………………., a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. We …………………….. that. And it's really important for us to remember history. Unless you're one of the first Americans, a ………………………………American, you came from someplace else, somebody …………………………. you. The Irish who left behind a land of ……………………….; the Germans who …………………. persecution; the Scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west; the Polish, the ………………………….., the Italians, ……………………………., the Japanese, the West Indians -- the huddled masses who came through …………………………… on one coast and Angel Island on the other. All those folks before they were us, they were them. And when each ……………………………………….. of immigrants arrived, they faced resistance from those who were already here. They faced ………………………………………. They faced ………………………………….. They faced ridicule. But over time, they went about their daily lives. They ……………………………….; a living as they raised a family, as they built a community, as their kids went to school here. They did their part to ………………………………… the nation. They were the Einsteins and the Carnegies, but they were also the millions of ……………………………….. and men whose names history may not ……………………….., but whose actions helped make us who we are, who built this ……………………………. hand by hand, brick by brick. They all came here knowing that what makes somebody an American is not just …………………or ………………………….., but allegiance to our founding …………………………………. and the faith in the ……………………. that anyone from anywhere can write the next great chapter of our ………………………………, and that's still true …………………………."

Correction:

"Immigration's always been an issue that inflames passions. That's not surprising. There are a few things that are more important to us as a society than who gets to come here and call our country home. Who gets the privilege of becoming a citizen of the United States of America. That's a big deal. When we talk about that in the abstract, it is easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. And when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. We forget that. And it's really important for us to remember history. Unless you're one of the first Americans, a Native American, you came from someplace else, somebody brought you. The Irish who left behind a land of famine; the Germans who fled persecution; the Scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west; the Polish, the Russians, the Italians, the Chinese, the Japanese, the West Indians -- the huddled masses who came through Ellis Island on one coast and Angel Island on the other. All those folks before they were us, they were them. And when each new wave of immigrants arrived, they faced resistance from those who were already here. They faced hardship. They faced racism. They faced ridicule. But over time, they went about their daily lives. They earned a living as they raised a family, as they built a community, as their kids went to school here. They did their part to build the nation. They were the Einsteins and the Carnegies, but they were also the millions of women and men whose names history may not remember, but whose actions helped make us who we are, who built this country hand by hand, brick by brick. They all came here knowing that what makes somebody an American is not just blood or birth, but allegiance to our founding principles and the faith in the idea that anyone from anywhere can write the next great chapter of our story, and that's still true today."

About Obama, first African American president

Now if you wish to use Barack Obama as an illustration of the American Dream, knowing that he was the first African American president, here are some facts:
(Et maintenant , si tu désires utiliser Barack Obama comme illustration du rêve américain sachant qu’il a été le premier président afro-américain, voilà quelques faits)

Barack Obama is the 44 President of the United States of America. He is also the winner of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize. He made history in 2008 when he won the U.S. presidential election. He is the first African American to be President. Obama's charisma, intelligence, and powerful speeches have made him extremely popular with many Americans. He has been very successful with his message for change.

Obama was born in Hawaii in 1961 to a black Kenyan father and white American mother. His parents divorced and his mother married an Indonesian man. Barack's family moved to Indonesia in 1967. He attended schools in Jakarta until he was ten years old, when he returned to Hawaii. Obama majored in political science and international relations at Columbia University in New York.

Obama's wedding mythes et héros

Barack and Michelle LaVaughn Robinson met at the Sidney Austin law firm where they worked together. They were wed on October 3, 1992.

After four years in New York, Obama moved to Chicago. There, he worked as the director of a community project from 1985 to 1988. He entered Harvard Law School and became the first black president of the Harvard Law Review. Obama taught law at the University of Chicago Law School for twelve years. He became an Illinois Senator in 1996.

In 2004, Obama was elected as a U.S. Senator. He supported legislation on conservation, energy, immigration and honest leadership. Obama had to battle with serious issues such as the economy. He beat Mitt Romney to win a second term in office, despite a poor economy and high unemployment. He thanked voters by promising to spend his second term honouring their support, saying: "There's a lot more work to do."

The Obama couple have two daughters. Malia Ann was born on July 4, 1998, and Natasha (Sasha) was born on June 10, 2001.

This is an extract from Famous People Lesson  where you will be able to read and practise exercises on different famous people you may want to describe for you Alevel exam.

Here is a link to the SOUTHSIDE WITH YOU Movie TRAILER (BARACK OBAMA Romance - 2016)

I wish you good luck!! And enjoy this lesson about Myths and Heroes!! Un cours de soutien scolaire anglais spécial bac...

 

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